Friday, August 9, 2013

Inverted Tatting

 I need to get on if I'm to learn 25 new techniques in a year for my 25 motif challenge. This is my 21st challenge, inverted tatting. Chains are made to face the wrong way and joined to picots using the 'ball' thread instead of the shuttle thread. I looked at pictures of work by Judith Connors and Martha Ess, watched a video on Karen Cabrera's blog and read Mark Myers's instructions on Georgia Seitz's site.  And then tried it out. It's not all that difficult. I like the idea, gained from discussions on In Tatters, that the join should be centred, but I can see in Karen's video and Mark's instructions that it's not necessarily so. There don't seem to be  patterns available, other than in Judith Connor's book,  so I will have to do my own thing! The flower above is my first 'invention'.

17 comments:

  1. Looks very nice! Something new to learn, thanks for the links.

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  2. Well done on having a go at it, I have not tried it yet but I am interested in how you are getting on. The pieces are looking good
    Margaret

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  3. I enjoy inverted tatting and learnt from Martha at Tat Days, hence Palmetto Tatters have a few patterns on their 2012 CD. At Easter time I made the rabbit and the daffodil. I like your flower invention and see great possiblities for this technique, only the challenge to do something about it has sort of remained in my head!

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    1. Oh yes, I remember your rabbit and being puzzled how the ears were done. Perhaps the patterns will become available to non attenders after a while?

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    2. The patterns for 2012 are still available on a CD and can be bought by going here http://www.palmettotatters.org/items/index.asp
      Or you might just go on designing your own!

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  4. Seems to me I have used this method in patterns that appear in some of the Japanese publications. It is very effective and I like doing it.

    Your examples are pretty!
    Fox : )

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  5. Excellent point about the amount of patterns for this out there. That's what I was doing with the cluny weave and my blog. I also like the flower pattern you have come up with, looks like one petal has about 20 ds in it. If you in the mood I wonder if trying about 12 or 15 would make little short petals. also the long thin one if it were thinner might make a great body of a butterfly and the big flower petals for wings. On a dragon fly too! I have a wild imagination just ran with it.

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  6. Yes, I thought of a dragon fly too. Perhaps I'll come up with one.

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  7. The best source for inverted tatting patterns is the book,"New Dimensions in Tatting" by To de Haan-van Beek. It's out of print, so you have to have to search the used dealers for it.

    The patterns from the Palmetto classes are available from the Palmetto Tatters Guild on their site, with a CD for each year.

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  8. Great tatting. Seems to me that Kathy Lowe had some inverted tatting on her blog or on line somewhere a few years ago. Someone else may remember? Karen in OR

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    1. I don't know Kathy Lowe, thanks, I'll follow that up.

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  9. That's an interesting look. I've never heard of inverted tatting before. There's always something new to learn!

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    1. Yes, amazing, isn't it, I'm glad I set out to learn more techniques.

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  10. While I am still fairly new to tatting I think I saw a butterfly body that used this method in Priscilla Tatting Book no.2, it's found online here: http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/monographs/pris_tat2.pdf

    Figure 26 shows a close up for details.
    Is this the same method you used? Your work is lovely.

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    1. Thanks Synderai. No, I've made the butterfly from the Priscilla book, it uses a different technique. It has picots on a chain of Victorian sets and then joins to those. It uses a normal join, whereas in inverted tatting you use the 'ball thread' to join.

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  11. Those are very interesting!! :)

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