Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Winter Tomatoes


The tomato crop that Jack planted in late Summer was still very green when frost threatened. If they froze, they'd turn to mush and that would be that. So Jack picked them, even though we weren't sure they'd ripen. It took a while, but they are ripening splendidly on the kitchen windowsill.  I must admit that they don't taste quite as good as Summer tomatoes, but they're acceptable and I'm glad the crop was saved. ( 'Crop' is an exaggeration, it's only a few plants.)

10 comments:

  1. We're eagerly awaiting our first summer tomatoes! We've been enjoying broccoli this week. I love fresh fruits and vegetables from the garden!

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  2. My plants are just starting to flower, hopefully this year I will get a few tomatoes, I tried a few years ago and failed this year looks more promising

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  3. Do you make fried green tomatoes? It's a delicacy here in the Southern part of the US.

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    1. I saw the film!I don't think that counts. I've tried making green tomato jam, but I hate the smell of green tomatoes cooking.

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  4. A very long time ago I had a tomato- picking job- the rule was that if they had even the very tiniest spot if red they would ripen and were OK to be picked and lacked. I remember it being backbreaking work.

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    1. It sounds back breaking! We pick them early to foil the birds, but these really were green, without any spot of red.

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  5. I bet they would make a good "mater sammich", as some here in the south call it.

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  6. I plant one tomato plant every year and got my first on 2 days ago and ate it like an apple­čśâ I now a mandoline that placed them in paper bags through out winter.

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    1. Fabulous to eat your first tomato of the season! We've tried protecting them, but Winters here are severe and paper bag is not going to work.

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