Friday, August 28, 2015

On The Podium (Just!)

My traditional doily was awarded 5th place in the national competition. 'Damning with faint praise' is the phrase that comes to mind, but hey, those judges are very difficult to impress. The winning doily was tatted in size 100 thread and exquisite.
My Under an African Sky doily was also judged, garnering 69% as opposed to 81% for the other one. Here's my translation of the judges' comments: " Appearance Original but not typical of tatting. This section [of the competition] was intended to bring attention to a technique of historical cultural significance. Workmanship Only three kinds of stitches, single, double and picots, are historically used.   Interesting article from Africa with its own value. "  I'm pleased with the positive last sentence and happy that I achieved my aim of flying the flag for modern tatting. Tatting was the floating section for the competition and won't be on the agenda next year.

19 comments:

  1. I'm lost for words!! - the African Doily has made it's mark on the tatting world and I'm working on mine at the moment, Very slowly. The trees take such a long time!
    I don't think those judges know what they're looking at.......

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree with Maureen. Phooooeeey to the judges - send them to me and I'll show them what tatting is all about.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Your doilies are gorgeous! I wish they had garnered higher praise. Still, what an honor to have made it to the podium!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am lost for words too, your wonderful African mat was designed and brings African life into tatting,
    Your other mat is beautiful
    I am glad I don't know the judges I might have given them a peace of my mind, Tatting is an art in itself
    Margaret

    ReplyDelete
  5. Harumph. Your African doily is an amazing and innovative piece bar one. I've seen what other actual tatters have said, my guess is that it was not fully comprehended, much like the Impressionists in Paris. And I'd sure love to see 1-4 for the other, that doily is stunning!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I agree with Maureen, and add that the fact that tatting wont be on the agenda for next year, is there gentle way snuffing it out all together. So glad to have made your doily and maybe some day when we hold a "tatting representing countries from around the world" I will have the country of Africa tucked under my wing :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks very much everyone. To quote Abba, 'I feel like I win when I lose'!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I agree with everybody here. I loved tatting your doily, a first place for me in originality and because it's not typical. I've been told always that tatting has only 1 stitch to be learned, the double st., that sort of belief it is like saying that crochet it's only loops or bobbin lace it's only braids. Congratulation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The silly thing is, there's nothing there that isn't composed of ds and picots. I would make more sense if they said traditional tatting consists of rings and chains.

      Delete
  9. Both doilies look wonderful!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm no Judge but I believe they both deserve first place. They are beautiful and very, very well done.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Your tatting is exquisite and beautiful. Judges do not know everything and obviously make lots of mistakes. You should feel very proud of your accomplishments.

    ReplyDelete
  12. You are always a winner with us, Jane :-)
    Congratulations - winning at the national level is really something ! And in size 100 !!!
    I do wish your Under the African Sky doily was more appreciated (by judges) - you know how brilliant I think it is ! I guess we can say that "it is much ahead of it's times" .

    ReplyDelete
  13. Oh, as for stitches --- they should've said there are only 2.5 instead of 3 : double, half of that double (single), picot ;-P Why bestow us with that extra .5 - charity ?!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Congratulations on your traditional doily, the judges sound very picky, I think your African doily is great, it is unusual in its design with the cats around the edges.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Just plain ignorance on the part of those judges, obviously they have no idea how tatting has evolved over the years. With the advent of new techniques, skills and imagination it is truly an art form. Sorry for your disappointment but we all think your tatting is 1st Class - so there!!!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I also agree with Maureen. Both are gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I obviously missed this post, and I'm glad I'm sitting down! I guess I shouldn't have been surprised (shocked), because the rules were so strange to begin with. And what's this about including tatting only occasionally? I would think that they would be welcoming something new and different in tatting every year! They obviously aren't aware of the blog universe! They are stuck in another time and place!.

    We revere the amazing designs of the 'antique' patterns, and appreciate them! The older patterns are still challenging to tat and deserve to be admired and tatted even today! But the new techniques are exciting, and are taking us in new directions!
    I could write a lot more, but I should direct my comments to the judges. On the other hand, it's best that I don't!

    You know how I feel about the African Sky doily! It's absolutely ingenious! And 'tells a story'! I have had success adding the top rings to the interlocking rings using the 'loop tatted method' (described so well by Jane E) but admit it is not for the faint of heart! I believe I can eventually achieve the 16 trees and the sun ( I'm glad one can do them ahead of time), and finally 'start' the doily. I'm quite envious of those who have completed it - and some have finished more than one!

    Congratulation on your Fifth Place win for the lovely white doily in this National competition! I'm sure some of those who voted realize the artistry and innovation of African Sky!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I'm excited to hear you're making progress on your doily, especially using the tatted loop method! Yes, I think it's a shame that the judges are so conservative. It's not only in tatting. They're not moving forward and the whole organisation is in danger of gradually fizzling out because of it.

    ReplyDelete